Connect with us

News

Tinubu’s Camp on Edge As INEC Lawyers Confirm 25% Mandatory in Abuja

Published

on

Tinubu's Camp on Edge As INEC Lawyers Confirm 25% Mandatory in Abuja

INEC – The fate of Nigeria’s presidential election could hinge on a constitutional provision that requires a candidate to secure at least 25% of the votes cast in the Federal Capital Territory (FCT).

iexclusivenews reports that Neither the PDP’s Atiku Abubakar nor the APC’s Bola Tinubu met this requirement, according to the official results announced by INEC.

This has sparked a legal battle at the presidential election court in Abuja, where both parties are presenting their arguments and evidence.

RELATED: APC Thugs Invade Tribunal, Attacks Segun Sowunmi and Others

Peter Obi, LP Unleash Secret Weapon As PEPC Admits Results From 7 States

What does this mean for Nigeria’s democracy and stability? Read on to find out.

Hydro-geochemical features and groundwater attribute evaluation in North - central Abuja, Nigeria - ScienceDirect

Map of Nigeria showing FCT

 

What Does the Constitution Say?

According to [Section 134(2)(b) of the 1999 Constitution as amended, a candidate must secure 1/4th (25%) of votes cast in 2/3rd of the entire 36 States of Nigeria “And” 1/4th (25%) of votes cast in FCT. This means that both conditions must be met for a candidate to be declared as president-elect.

 

How Did the Candidates Perform in FCT?

The official results announced by INEC showed that neither the PDP’s candidate, Atiku Abubakar, nor the APC’s candidate, Bola Tinubu, met this requirement. Atiku got 24.8% of the votes cast in FCT, while Tinubu got 23.6%. This means that both candidates fell short of the constitutional threshold by a slim margin.

 

STATE APC LP NNPP PDP
Yobe 40.3%

[151,459]

0.63%

[2,406]

4.83% 52.48%

[198,567]

Enugu 1.05%

[4,772]

93.91%

[428,640]

0.4% 3.45%

[15,749]

Ogun 56%

[341,554]

14%

[85,829]

0.35%

[2,200]

20%

[123,831]

Ekiti 65.38%

[201,494]

3.70%

[11,397]

0.9% 29.06%

[89,554]

Lagos 46.198%

[572,606]

47%

[582,454]

0.68% 6.112%

[75,750]

Gombe 28.8%

[146,977]

5.1%

[26,160]

2.1% 62.2%

[319,123]

Adamawa 25%

[182,881]

14.5%

[105,648]

1.1% 57.2%

[417,611]

Katsina 45.6%

[482,283]

0.6%

[69,386]

6.6%

[6,376]

46.2%

[489,045]

Ondo 64.897%

[369,924]

8.306%

[47,350]

20.26%

[115,463]

Jigawa 45.8%

[421,390]

0.2%

[1,889]

10.7% 42.0%

[386,587]

Nasarawa 31%

[172,922]

34%

[191,361]

2.28%

[12,715]

26%

[147,093]

Benue 36.95

[310,468]

36.95%

[308,372]

0.56%

[4,740]

15.48%

[130,081]

Bauchi 35.88%

[316,694]

3.10%

[27.373]

8.17%

[72,103]

48.34%

[426.607]

Kaduna 28.49%

[399,293]

21.01%

[294,494]

6.63%

[92,969]

39.56%

[554,360]

Bayelsa 24.59%

[42,572]

28.87%

[49,975]

0.31%

[540]

39.75%

[68,818]

Ebonyi 12.56%

[42,402]

77%

[259,738]

0.49%

[1,661]

4%

[13,503]

Delta 13.77%

[90,183]

52%

[341,866]

0.47%

[3,122]

27%

[161,600]

Abuja 18.98%

[90,902]

59%

[281,717]

15%

[74,199]

Osun 45%

[343,945]

3%

[23,283]

47%

[354,366]

Rivers 41.8% [231,591] 31.6%

[175,071]

15.9%

[88,468]

Cross River 29.55%

[130,520]

40.7%

[179,917]

0.4%

[1,644]

21.6%

[95,425]

Imo 14%

[66,171]

75%

[352,904]

0.3%

[1,536]

6%

[30,044]

Kano 29.6%

[517,341]

1.6%

[28,513]

57%

[997,279]

7.5%

[131,716]

Borno 51%

[252,282]

1.44%

[7,205]

0.9%

[4,626]

38%

[190,921]

Niger 46%

[375,183]

9.9%

[80,452]

2.7%

[21,836]

35%

[284,898]

Abia 2.3%

[8,914]

85.69% [327,095] 6%

[22,676]

Anambra 0.8%

[5,111]

93.59%

[584,621]

0.31

[1,967]

1.44%

[9,036]

Kogi 50.57%

[240,751]

11.8%

[56,217]

0.89%

[4,238]

30.48%

[145,104]

Plateau 28%

[307,195]

42%[466,272] 0.8%

[8,869]

22%

[243,808]

Zamfara 57%

[298,396]

0.3%

[1,660]

0.78%

[4,044]

37%

[193,978]

Taraba 26%

[135,165]

28%

[146,315]

2%

[12,818]

37%

[189,017]

Kwara 53%

[263,572]

6.27%

[31,166]

0.63%

[3,141]

28%

[136,909]

Akwa Ibom 27%

[160,620]

22.58%

[132,683]

36.43

[214,012]

Edo 24%

[144,471]

55%

[331,163]

0.45

[2,743]

15%

[89,858]

Kebbi 42%

[248,088]

1.8%

[10,682]

0.85%

[5,038]

48% [285,175]
Sokoto 46.9%

[285,444]

1.08%

[6,568]

0.2%

[1,300]

47%

[288,679]

Oyo 50.8%

[449,884]

11.6%

[99,110]

0.48%

[4,095]

21%

[182,977]

Chart showing the percentage of votes cast in FCT for each candidate

 

What Does INEC Say?

INEC, through its lawyer, argued that since Atiku did not get 25% in FCT, he could not be declared president. The lawyer cross-examined a PDP witness at the tribunal on Monday afternoon and asked him if he was aware of this fact. The witness responded that he was, but also pointed out that Tinubu did not get 25% either.

 

What Does This Mean for the Case?

The interpretation of this section of the constitution could have a significant impact on the outcome of the case. The PDP and LP are challenging the validity of Tinubu’s election on various grounds, including irregularities, violence, and non-compliance with electoral laws. They are also seeking a fresh election or an order declaring Atiku as the winner.

The APC, on the other hand, is defending its victory and insisting that Tinubu met all the constitutional and legal requirements to be declared as president-elect. The party is also accusing the PDP and LP of fabricating evidence and spreading falsehoods.

UPDATED: Presidential election court adjourns pre-hearing session till Thursday Separato

Photo of the presidential election petition court

 

The presidential election court is expected to hear more witnesses and arguments from all parties before delivering its judgment. The verdict could have far-reaching implications for Nigeria’s democracy and stability.

 

Do you think this provision is fair and necessary? Share your thoughts in the comments section below

 

 

Copyright © IEXCLUSIVE.COM.NG